Commit 78a7413b authored by Markus Klinik's avatar Markus Klinik
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terminology: resources

parent 14320275
......@@ -40,8 +40,8 @@ We do not focus on the happy flow of missions, which by design has no resource c
\subsection{Terminology}
\paragraph{Tasks}
A \textbf{task} is work in the real world, the execution of which should be managed by our system.
A \textbf{basic task} is an atomic unit of work.
A \emph{task} is work in the real world, the execution of which should be managed by our system.
A \emph{basic task} is an atomic unit of work.
Atomic means that it is not useful to divide a task into subtasks.
For example, repairing a machine is a basic task.
......@@ -51,11 +51,28 @@ There would be no benefit in letting our system manage these subtasks.
The decision which tasks are basic tasks and which can be split up into subtasks must be made on a case-by-case basis, depending on whether one expects a benefit from from our system managing the subtasks.
\paragraph{Resources}
We call everything and everybody required to execute a task a \emph{resource}.
In order to execute a task, all required resources must be assigned to it.
We use the word ``assigned'' symmetrically:
We say a resource is assigned to a task, but also that the task is assigned to the resource.
Examples for resources are fire fighters and fire extinguishers for fire fighting, mechanics and tool boxes for repairing machines, or radars for tracking contacts.
The fire to be extinguished, the machine to be repaired and the contact to be tracked are not resources, but \emph{cases}.
Sometimes there is overlap between resources and cases.
This becomes a problem for our assumption that planning and scheduling can be clearly separated, as discussed in \cref{sec:planning-vs-scheduling}.
Resources come in two varieties: \emph{consumable} and \emph{reusable}.
Consumable resources are used up when executing their assigned task.
Reusable resources become free again when the task is finished, and can be assigned to new tasks.
Examples for consumable resources are fuel and food, examples for reusable resources are tools and people.
In earlier work \cite{KlinikJP2017, Klinik2017} we study this difference in more detail.
For simplicity we focus entirely on reusable resources in this paper.
\begin{itemize}
\item Resource
\item Capability
\item Capability requirement \todo{use consistently}
\end{itemize}
......@@ -9,8 +9,10 @@ In contrast, project scheduling problems involve tasks that require several reso
An \emph{instance} of a scheduling problem is a set of concrete tasks and resources with concrete numbers for which a schedule has to be found.
A \emph{scheduler} has the responsibility of finding a schedule given an instance.
\paragraph{Planning vs scheduling}
foobar \todo{Say that we are not interested in planning, only scheduling}
\subsection{Planning vs scheduling}
\label{sec:planning-vs-scheduling}
Lorem ipsum \todo{Say that we are not interested in planning, only scheduling}
\subsection{Scheduling for C2}
......
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